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English 51
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. so, this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> certainly having lived through it. i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> there's the possibility of parts of our city flooding or high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
affected by the floodings and power out nl outa irene. >> you know, irene was more of a direct hit in a way because this area saw a lot of flooding, saw a lot of rain from it. in fact, i was speaking with someone here just a few minutes ago about what happened in this area, this highway 12. coastal highway 12. there was a major section of that that washed away from the storm. this morning what we're expecting to see, again, that first band of strong winds, the rain that will be coming through, again, the storm has been downgraded, but officials are saying, you know, do not take the storm for granted. it still will be a strong storm that bring winds and anywhere from 40 to 50 miles per hour i was told. but, you know, at this point, people are paying very close attention, i should say, to what's happening out here in the skies. >> as they should. george howell in the outer banks of north carolina, thank you. >>> meanwhile, you know, millions of people could lose power from this storm and the edison electric institute is warning people that outages could last for seven to ten days. right now t
received? >> we don't have the exact counts on that. there is water damage. >> hurricane irene, we know state wide $1.3 billion in damages your community affect bid that. any lessons learned from that in 2011? >> we here abide by our planning and execute our 120 hour plan of giving people plenty of notice in an impending danger is coming. and we always hope for the best. unfortunately, the worst has come. >> okay. finally wrapping up any word you have to residents you that want to leave with them with this sneng. >> only use 911 for life threatening emergencies. nor nonlife threatening emergencies use our nonlife threatening emergency hot line. >> thank you. we'll check back in with you. thank you. >> this storm is making its presence felt now. sandy taking aim at the nornl east this hour. warnings to head for higher ground coming for days now. coming up next, we're live where 30,000 people were told to get out and get out, fast. >> catastrophic event we have faced in any of our lifetimes. >> there will be people who die in this storm. >> this is not the time to be a show off or stupid.
through that we might know? >> exactly. it was very similar to hurricane irene last summer where the winds expanded several hundred miles out from the center of the storm. in a typical hurricane, most of the strong winds are near the core of the hurricane. in this case, obviously the strong winds were hundreds and hundreds of miles out from the center. that is very similar to hurricane irene last year. >> greta: do you fly straight through it? i imagine it's a rough ride and when you get to the eye of the storm it's calm. is that not what happens? >> well, we fly at 10,000 feet, and the idea is to go right through the center of the hurricane so you can measure the core of the storm, and then also measure the winds on the periphery of the storm, so it normally gets very rough right near the center and then typically out away from the center when the winds lighten up, it's not so bad any more, and in this case, for hurricane irene, at least on friday, the strong winds were well out from the center, and we had some really nasty stuff to go through on the north side of the storm, probably 105,
surge right now, that's just the water rise alone with this, 6.6 feet. that's 2.2 feet higher than irene. we're awaiting that high tide coming up. for example, irene was about right here, all right, and what we could see with another two and a half feet is up through here. >> no campaigning for the president. he is locked down at the white house, telephoning governors and mayors and meeting with fema. >> mitt romney is not campaigning but holding what his campaign calls a hurricane relief event coincidentally in battleground ohio. >> we have a lot of goods here and i know there's more coming in and we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey. >> new yorkers ordered off the streets last night it was a lonely late night for letterman and fallon. no live audiences to laugh at their jokes. >> got up this morning, turned on the radio and listened for the talk show closings. i have no luck. >> talk show closings. >> yeah. >> that's a play on -- >> wait a minute. i think i hear people banging at t
. but people are taking preparations. and perhaps because of this, victor. when irene came through, irene was more of a direct hit in this area. in fact, there's a coastal road that runs along here, highway 12, a good part of that was washed out. they're not expecting quite a direct hit with this particular storm, but again, they are talking about the wind, the rain and power outages. and victor, that's really what people are bracing for as the storm gets to us. >> i'm wondering, george, i saw an analyst yesterday saying this is going to be a lot worse than irene. are people sticking around for it, or are they boarding up and getting out of town? >> reporter: you know, when you walk around, when you take a look at how people are preparing for this storm, everyone's keeping a very close eye on us, as we report what's happening. they're watching the track of the storm system. right now it looks like it will move in a little further north than where we are. but we will feel the first brunt of the storm. we will see a lot of the winds that come through, the winds that could get up 40, 50 mile
than lost power during hurricane irene. this is a monumental, monumental task that we have in front of us. i would ask them this week for their patience and then the week after that, we will need their resilience as we begin to go back to work and rebuild our state. but we're going to continue to work, we're doing search and rescue missions now, still. we have been doing them all day. we have been saving hundreds of people from places across new jersey and law enforcement is committed to continuing to do that until nightfall again tonight, then we'll start again tomorrow morning. >> you have a young family, are they all okay? where were they when this was going down? and what do you say to your children, what does any parent say to a child when this kind of catastrophe happens on their doorstep? >> well, first off, you give them a hug and say don't be scared, mom and dad will protect you. that's the first thing you do. second, my family was at our family home in mendham when we lost power finally late yesterday afternoon. the state police moved them down to the governor's residence
get. you are would have to make your own way. >> where do you rate this? >> i was here for irene. certainly, as everyone else has said, it is a more intense and unprecedented storm to what it has done to operations, we are also bringing some of them back. >> thank you for joining us tonight. >> we have re-established on the phone, m.laroso on the phone. thank you for joining us. how long, we are asking the questions everyone else wants answers to i'm sure. >> glad to give you information. we've been able to make good progress today. we are down from our peak from under 1.4 million customers. so, more than 25% of the location that is were damaged those customers that weere interrupted were restored. we were able to restore service to newark airport. we restored service to the city of newark and elizabeth. >> the remains million people how long will they have to wait? >> i don't want to give you an exact number. we think there will be stragglers. those are the customers that have individual services down. but we plan to get most of the customers back within that seven day window. >
lessons from the last storm. >> reporter: connecticut is one of 13 states haunted by last year's irene, and the nearly 16 billion in damage, leaving thousands without power for days. then hit by a surprising snowstorm on halloween out power today, governor malloy warned it could be the type of storm not seen in 30 years. >> have enough food and water for everyone in your household. assume there will be an elongated period of time in which you will be without energy. >> reporter: at the massachusetts store? power supplies were hot items st? >> i have generators, make sure we have oil, flash lights, got to be prepared. >> reporter: storm surge is another worry, with a full moon, sunday night prepared. being a difficult combination, it sent the area in norfolk, virginia, out to sea. others sought safe harbor. and along the new jersey shore, these people sought safe harbor others sought safe >> i may as well take the right steps, get the boat out of the way. >> reporter: this boat yard couldn't keep up with requests. >> no, i'm sorry, we can't take boats out of the water. >> reporter: they
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
. irene brought in $4.3 billion in damage last year. it was one of the top ten costliest u.s. returns in history. the insurance adjusters are already on the scene they could go in as early as wednesday and write checks on the spot for policyholders>> wall street some of the banks are heclosed today. >> they are closed today and likely tomorrow. electronic trading late last night much of lower manhattan has already been evacuated. they are operating on a work at home basis. heather? >> here is something of major concern we have seen gas prices dip recently but they could be on their way up. that's because refineries could be shut down. >> 6 northeast oil refineries could be affected they have 6.2 million of barrels a day. october 1st the official month in the 2013 model year. if some of the car dearlies shut down they may not be unloading the vehicles. >> keep our fishings crossed on gas prices and insurance issues as well. >> lauren thank you so much. >> good to see you. quick look at headlines. he was the prime suspect. ainsley take it away from here. >> he was the prime suspect in t
outage problems. if you think there are 0 million people without power, with irene people didn't have power for well over a week. in this case it possibly turned into the same thing. a week from tomorrow is election day. it's possible a big part of the area won't have power by the time they get towards next tuts. >> people with power, it's freezing cold. 48 degrees. rick, thank you. >> some parts of jersey city under curfew. jersey city mayor joins us by phone. good evening, mayor. and what is the status of your city tonight, sir? >> good evening, we took a pretty good beating in jeersy city tonight. high tide concurred with the grounding and landing of the hurricane all at a full moon. meet yolists predict this urge up the hudson and rivers and they were right, it was unprecedented. the river surged from both rivers. we issued mandatory evacuations 7:00 a.m. monday, this morning. people didn't abide by that. it has to do with that title surge. concurring with the time that hurricane hit wland high winds. >> is there any deaths or serious injuries? >> a lot of damage and property dama
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
year, when irene came through here, and at some point, on the island, the bay actually touched the atlantic ocean. now, also reminiscent is what's going on in new york city, and that's that the mass transit has been shut down and we're talking the subways. the buses and the trains there. 5 million people go through their daily, so, really crippling that area, and you saw new york city mayor michael bloom berg and he's saying that the 1.1 million kids and city schools will not be going to class tomorrow. however, the new york stock exchange will be open, harris. >> harris: they're going to run on generators we understand and have electronic voting down on the new york stock exchange and anna kooiman, thank you very much. we're getting your images of the behemoth storm, and this is your point of view. patty shea snapped photos at rudy's inlet at virginia beach. wow. paul blare sending this photo of his brother ben pelted by rain and high winds in virginia bridge. and david d'amico from long port, new jersey, as it's coming up from that area, south of new york. and massive waves c
in the same spot as when hurricane irene hit. >> shepard: how bad is that? >> it can fill up a couple of feet. >> shepard: be careful out there, i know it's going to be a long night because these winds and the rains are scheduled to continue throughout the night. we have the weather loop again. i want to he show you one characteristic that the weather folks didn't anticipate. here is kind of the center of it right as it goes ashore. all the rain is on this side. the back side is almost completely dry. not like a tropical system at all. more like a nor'easter with all of the wetness on this side. can you see it stretches way past cleveland. but up here, not as much rain. tonight, it's wind and sturgeon in new york city as we approach high tide. we're back with with the continuing coverage in three minutes as fox reports live tonight. 'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agit
worse than when i stood here 14 months ago for hurricane irene. i would say that broadway which runs the entire length of new york city parallel with the ocean is under something like 5 feet. every single home is impossible to imagine how all of them aren't completely inundated on the ground level. the water goes back street after street after street as far as we can see. we cannot get out of this hotel right now to explore further. but it is a desperate situation for anybody who did not heed those warnings, which were said again and again by officials. get off of what is a barrier island. get out while you can. now it is way way too late. we wait for day break to see when this surge ends. and also the extent of the damage it has done. it is going to be bad here in long beach city and across the length of long island, shep. you and i have covered a the love hurricanes and we have seen a lot of storms. can i tell you i have never seen a storm surge like this, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt live on long island in new york. so, it's becoming clear what we are witnessing from virginia b
's all said and done, the total $20 billion or more. exceeding the damage certainly from irene last year which was about 12 to $16 billion. meantime moody's an lytics estimate economic losses will total $10 billion a day, lost wages, production, sales for businesses. do you think that estimate is on target? >> yeah, i think that estimate is on target but i believe moody's said they're not going to alter their estimate for gdp in the fourth quarter because some of this will be made up and also some of this stuff that gets destroyed you have to put people to work to rebuild it. that actually adds to gross domestic product. it subtracts from the net but adds to the growth. >> one thing i'm being told in my ear, we have an updated death toll i want to pass along to everyone. we now have 27 -- 29, excuse me, 29 confirmed deaths. again, we started this hour it was 18. so the numbers are fluid and moving up rapidly, at least over the last hour that we've seen so far. one thing -- jared, go ahead. >> terrible devastation as you've been reporting all hour. one thing to consider is that insurance
this was an unprecedented event. we weathered hurricane irene 14 or 15 months ago with the same emergency preparations and it didn't come close to endangering the hospital. this hospital sits 20 feet above sea level, we're actually 15 feet higher than nyu hospital next door because the terrain rises slightly here, so it was obviously not anticipated that we would get a storm surge of this magnitude, the national hurricane center was predicting even at its highest 11-foot storm surge, so clearly here out of the east river, just because of the way the waters were being pushed and the level of the wind speeds, we wound up getting a lot of water here. we've never seen anything like this at bellevue hospital. >> thank you very much. we appreciate your taking the time tonight. >>> the monumental task of removing debris and getting the lights turned back on is under way on long island, new york. complicating matter this is evening, roadways are still blocked by floodwaters and preventing about 5,000 utility workers from even starting to restore power to parts of that island. republican congressman peter king
irene, goes by, the wind goes to the west even though it's strong to the west. it blows everything out. in this particular case, the wind keeps coming in from the southeast. >> yeah. all right. so the next thing i want to ask in terms of what -- for the people that didn't leave and heed the warning of governor cuomo in new york, governor kristchris kristi in new jersey, there a chance their homes could be below water. >> yeah. they could be below water for quite a while. what will happen is the tide tries to go out, and the wind will keep trying to stop the tietide from going out. it's a y dangerous situation. one of the things i got real upset with and i talked to you yesterday for quite a while about the whole situation is not putting the hurricane warning in effect because people think oh, it's a big nor'easter coming. big deal. we've gone through big nor'easters before. when the hurricane warning is put in effect because you have a hurricane coming, it's a very different story. my suggestion is once you've named that storm, you leave the name and the class fakings is important. >>
. >> it is handed down through generations to generations. and what happened here really was when irene came last time, everybody left and a lot of people have houses, they got devastated. i think people felt this time, just wait here and see what happens. whether you're here or not, this is tremendous. to rebuild this will be a mammoth -- i don't know how they'll go about starting it. this is really tragic. >> reporter: this area, everybody is assessing the damage, but take a look, look at this car, the rubber of the tires completely burned off. the interior reduced to smithere smithereens, people did not move their cars out and as a result, they simply caught fire. homes that are nearby that didn't actually get the full impact of the fire, the siding melted off from the sheer heat. you can see some firefighters here, again, they have been here around the clock, through the night this is a dmcommunity whe you have firefighters, retired police officers, folks from the coast guard, all know each other, all grow up here and they're assessing the damage. the smell is so pungent, anderson, of the fir
outages. they had hundreds of thousands of people without power during irene last year. they expect the same this year, probably even worse. they are thinking maybe as many as 600,000 without power for days to come. again the surge is really going to be problem here. we'll see that later in the evening and into tomorrow. matt? >> we spoke to connecticut's governor daniel malloy earlier this morning. he said this storm is one of the biggest threats to human life in his state in years. i began by asking governor malloy what worries him specifically about sandy. >> it's the next two tides. could experience tides this afternoon at about what the perfect storm was. tonight's tide during the nighttime hours could be twice that, and that's our biggest worry. if that happens it really is catastrophic. the amount of damage and loss of property is going to be extreme. we've been talking about it for days. we've prepared. we have people trying places. we have equipment in the right places. really we're waiting to see what mother nature throws at us. let's be clear. this storm is staying on scr
morning. people need to have is a place to go. this will not be like irene. this will be a much more are significant storm and likely the most significant storm there that anybody there in that area has ever lived through. back to you now. >> rick,ing thank you very much. >> shannon: the scandal surrounding the terror attack in benghazi just keeps growing. we had utah congressman jason chaffetz on the show. here is what he had to say about his conversation with commander of the u.s. africa command about requests for cia operatives for help during the benghazi assault. >> ky tell you on a first hand account in my meeting i dissed specifically did we have resources in the area the answer is, yes. did we have proximity and the answer is, yes. asked why we didn't send in the assets the general said he was not requested to do so meaning that somebody higher up than him. he is a four star general which there aren't a whole lot of people between him and the president did not request him to take action and that is what is so concerning. did requests per collate up from the ground for the peo
that is $5 billion more than hurricane irene. guaranteed that number goes up and 10 to $30 billion more in lost business. connell: let's talk about the new york stock exchange, one of the big story today that the exchanges back at it and open for the first time since hurricane sandy. close on monday and tuesday and early this morning nicole petallides had the chance to speak with c e o duncan neiderauer and asked if they could have opened the stock exchange earlier than today. >> we could have. it would have been irresponsible in light of what we know. we could have operated electronically and what the industry clearly told us on sunday was please don't open electronically because we have to put a lot of our people in harm's way so let's not do that. do i wish we came to a decision earlier? sure. but we all made the right decision. it would have been irresponsible and dangerous to be open monday and tuesday. dagen: coming up on quarter past the hour and want to do stocks now and every 15 minutes. back to nicole petallides to talk about that and gm today. nicole: the play-by-play, the be
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toƩ@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
-- just came through philadelphia last year. >> brian: was it irene? >> we're ready for it. >> brian: what i like about this in termination of it's going to be a severe storm, but you've given us lead time of the we've had four days, maybe more to prepare. it's up to personal responsibility. you can only do so much the do you agree? >> that's exactly right. it is up to the people to keep themselves out of harm's way. we ask them to stay off the streets once the winds start, to clean up their backyard so there are no projectiles flying that could harm them and just be prepared for maybe an extended period of time without electricity because as we know, this type of high winds, are going to knockout line, trees will go down, they need to be ready for an extended period of time without electricity. >> steve: i can't talk to you the last time a governor of a state regarding a hurricane, that wasn't along the coast. for the most part, pennsylvania is not a coastal state and yet here you've got this gigantic, historic storm that's wreaking havoc right there in your state of pennsylvania. >> bria
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)